Graduate Students

Ashley Pritchard, M.A., Ph.D. Student

Ashley New PhotoAshley Pritchard is currently a graduate student in the Clinical-Forensic Psychology doctoral training stream. She received her B.A. (Hons) in Psychology from the University of British Columbia and her M.A. in Clinical Psychology from Simon Fraser University. Her Master’s thesis, completed under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Douglas, investigated risk factors for the co-occurrence of violence and victimization in a sample of mentally disordered individuals. Her dissertation will evaluate the impact of End Gang Life, a provincial anti-gang initiative. Her research areas of interest include violence risk assessment and management, treatment, mentally disordered offenders, victimization, and gang involvement. Her doctoral work is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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Adam Blanchard, M.A., Ph.D. Student

Adam - New PhotoAdam Blanchard is a Ph.D. student in the Experimental Psychology and Law program at Simon Fraser University. He completed his B.A. (Hons.) under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Douglas. His Honour’s thesis investigated the concurrent validity of version three of the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the HCR:V3 is related to and postdictive of violence, and rating the idiographic relevance and manifestations of each risk factor added incrementally to the presence ratings. He also completed his M.A. under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Douglas in the Clinical Forensic Psychology program. His Master’s thesis examined the dynamic nature of violence risk assessments. Specifically, using a longitudinal repeated measures research design, he investigated the changeability of ratings on the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20 (HCR-20) and the Short-term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START). Most broadly, his research interests include risk assessment and risk management, as well as the perpetration of crime and violence. More specifically, he is interested in the link between risk assessment and risk management, the role of dynamic risk factors in risk assessments, case formulation, multi-level risk assessment, integrated treatment services, psychopathy, homelessness, and gang involvement. His doctoral work is being funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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Catherine Shaffer, M.A., Ph.D. Student

Catherine Shaffer Headshot 1Catherine Shaffer is a Ph.D. student in Experimental Psychology (Law and Forensic specialization) working under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Douglas and Dr. Jodi Viljoen. She completed her Honours B.A. in 2010 at the University of Victoria and her M.A. in 2014 at SFU. In general, she is interested in the assessment and management of violence in youth and adult populations and the identification of factors that respectively increase or decrease the likelihood of general and specialized forms of violence. The focus of her research during her M.A. was mainly concentrated in the following areas: risk and protective factors for youth gang violence, risk factors for violence perpetration and violent victimization in civil psychiatric populations, and the relationship between psychopathic features and offending in youth. For her dissertation, she plans on adapting an adult intimate partner violence risk assessment tool for use with adolescents. Catherine’s doctoral work is funded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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Dylan Gatner, M.A., Ph.D. Student

Dylan is a Doctoral student in the Clinical-Forensic stream at SFU who completed his M.A and honours thesis under the supervision of Dr. Douglas. His main research interests surround the area of psychopathy, including the societal burden of psychopathy and conceptualization of psychopathy. Dylan’s Master’s thesis examined the relevance of boldness in different contemporary models of psychopathy (i.e., the CAPP and FFM of psychopathy). His research interests also include threat assessment, suicide attempts, and ethnic differences in forensic psychology. Dylan’s Doctoral work is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. 

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Katherine Hanniball, M.A, Ph.D. Student

Kate Katherine Hanniball is a PhD. Student in the Experimental Psychology and Law program at Simon Fraser University. She received her B.A from the University of Puget Sound and her M.A. in Experimental Psychology from Simon Fraser University. Her Master’s thesis, completed under the joint supervision of Dr.’s Lara Aknin and Kevin Douglas, explored the emotional benefits of prosocial behavior in antisocial and criminal populations. Broadly speaking Katherine’s research interests include the conceptualization and measurement of psychopathy, forensic risk assessment, resilience, and the impact of life satisfaction and well-being on recidivism and violent behavior in offender populations.

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Jay Musen, B.A. (Hons.), M.A. Student

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Erin Fuller, B.A. (Hons.), M.A. Student

Erin is a M.A. student in the Clinical-Forensic Psychology track. Erin completed her honours thesis under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Douglas and Dr. Jodi Viljoen. Erin’s thesis examined the relationship between risk and protective factors for youth criminality and violence, as well as the role of resilience in explaining outcomes of youth offending. Broadly, her research interests include violence risk assessment and management, offender rehabilitation and reintegration, resilience, risk and protective factors for violence and chronic offending, psychopathic personality disorder, suicide and self-harm in forensic populations, and cultural sensitivity in forensic risk assessment. Erin’s M.A. work is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

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Sanam Monjazeb, B.A., M.A. Student

Sanam Monjazeb is a M.A. student in the Clinical-Forensic Psychology track at Simon Fraser University. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Davis and went on to complete a post-baccalaureate degree at the University of California, Irvine, where she conducted research on juvenile justice and domestic violence issues. Her current research interests involve the development of interventions for the reduction of violence, resilience and protective factors in forensic assessment, the relationship between violence and mental illness, and offender rehabilitation and reintegration.

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